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Urban mobility planning
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Good planning helps choosing and designing the right measures, or packages of measures, for a city’s particular transport context, and getting them off the ground.

A Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP) – a strategic plan designed to satisfy the mobility needs of people and businesses in cities and their surroundings for a better quality of life - can play a big role in this regard. To discover more about these plans, visit the dedicated Mobility Plans section on Eltis.

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By rswa178 / Updated: 15 Aug 2018

Standards for Developing a SUMP Action Plan

A report from the CIVITAS SUMPS-Up project provides city planners with the step-by-step know-how necessary to develop SUMP action plans. Furthermore, it takes into account different levels of SUMP development experience and SUMP maturity among cities.

The report contains guidance in terms of what to include in an action plan, including responsibilities, resources, stakeholder coordination, time plans, and funding sources.

In addition, it breaks down the process of developing an action plan into a six-step process, with the final stage of this an implementation plan.

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By Pavlina Dravecka / Updated: 11 Dec 2014

Bristol invites public to imagine, and then decide on, the future of their city

There is no one path to realising more sustainable mobility, as evident by the wide-variety of transport measures on offer that can lower emissions, reduce pollution and create greener urban areas. But with limited budgets and the knowledge that infrastructural change can majorly alter the character of a city, how should local leaders prioritise one measure over another? And how can citizens be involved in this decision making process, granting them a real sense of ownership over the process?

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By Eltis Team / Updated: 11 Aug 2015

EC Urban Mobility Video

Undefined

The Urban Mobility Video is a three-minute film that explains the approach of the European Commission about urban mobility. It starts with a problem-setting part in which, without voice-over, difficult urban mobility situation are shown in slow motion: a cyclist hit by a car, a woman in a crowded bus that has to brake suddenly, a man in his car who can't stand the traffic jams, emissions and noise anymore, pedestrians who do not have enough space to walk on the pavement etc.

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By Hannah Figg / Updated: 17 Jun 2019

2040 transport Master Plan announced by Singapore

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Through a newly announced 20-year Master Plan, Singapore hopes that expenditure in public transport can lessen commutes by developing a “45-minute city with 20-minute towns”. This plan is based on the Singapore Land Transport Authority’s (LTA) long-term ideas to develop a comprehensive, well-connected, convenient and fast-paced land transport system that fulfils the requirements and wishes of Singaporeans over the next 20 years and more.

To achieve the aspiration of a “45-minute city with 20-minute towns”, LTA will:

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By Claus Köllinger / Updated: 17 Jun 2019

Final Report Civitas Prosperity "Supporting local and national authorities to improve the quality and uptake of SUMPs" published

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The H2020 financed SUMP project PROSPERITY that supports local and national governments to improve the quality and take-up of Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans is in its final months. 

By Ella Andrew / Updated: 17 Jun 2019

Cities 4.0

By 2050, over 70% of the world population will be living in cities covering less than 2% of the earth’s surface, creating significant challenges for cities.

Cities of the future should be hyper-connected, technologically-equipped and smart; to enhance the lives of residents. The development and combination of new technologies, such as the Internet of Things, Big Data and Artificial Intelligence offer a multifaceted solution for transforming cities.

By Thomas Mourey / Updated: 14 Jun 2019
By Thomas Mourey / Updated: 14 Jun 2019

Dresden, planning for multimodality and measuring the results

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Dresden (Germany) was named one of the three finalists in the 7th European SUMP Award that was presented by European Transport Commissioner Violeta Bulc on 21 March 2019. This is the second time that Dresden has been a finalist in the awards. Dresden’s approach to monitoring and evaluation was commended four years ago and the city has once again impressed the jury, this time with forward-looking planning which addresses multimodality in transport planning.

By Ash Oyofo / Updated: 14 Jun 2019

Draft Revised SUMP Guidelines now available to review

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The draft second edition of the European SUMP Guidelines has been published for stakeholders and practitioners to review and provide feedback. Online feedback is invited until 9 July 2019 and the revised Guidelines will be discussed in detail at the sixth annual SUMP Conference in Groningen, 17-18 June 2019. Interested parties can download the drafts, provide feedback on the main document - or email section authors directly using feedback links provided to give their thoughts.
By Dagmar Roeller / Updated: 14 Jun 2019

Policy & Project Manager

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Polis is looking for an experienced policy & project manager who will be employed on a full-time long-term contract. The policy and project manager will coordinate Polis’ policy and advocacy activities and will manage European-funded projects in the field of sustainable urban mobility and transport innovation. Apply until 17 June.

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