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Urban mobility planning
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Good planning helps choosing and designing the right measures, or packages of measures, for a city’s particular transport context, and getting them off the ground.

A Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP) – a strategic plan designed to satisfy the mobility needs of people and businesses in cities and their surroundings for a better quality of life - can play a big role in this regard. To discover more about these plans, visit the dedicated Mobility Plans section on Eltis.

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By rswa178 / Updated: 15 Aug 2018

Standards for Developing a SUMP Action Plan

A report from the CIVITAS SUMPS-Up project provides city planners with the step-by-step know-how necessary to develop SUMP action plans. Furthermore, it takes into account different levels of SUMP development experience and SUMP maturity among cities.

The report contains guidance in terms of what to include in an action plan, including responsibilities, resources, stakeholder coordination, time plans, and funding sources.

In addition, it breaks down the process of developing an action plan into a six-step process, with the final stage of this an implementation plan.

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By Pavlina Dravecka / Updated: 11 Dec 2014

Bristol invites public to imagine, and then decide on, the future of their city

There is no one path to realising more sustainable mobility, as evident by the wide-variety of transport measures on offer that can lower emissions, reduce pollution and create greener urban areas. But with limited budgets and the knowledge that infrastructural change can majorly alter the character of a city, how should local leaders prioritise one measure over another? And how can citizens be involved in this decision making process, granting them a real sense of ownership over the process?

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By Eltis Team / Updated: 11 Aug 2015

EC Urban Mobility Video

Undefined

The Urban Mobility Video is a three-minute film that explains the approach of the European Commission about urban mobility. It starts with a problem-setting part in which, without voice-over, difficult urban mobility situation are shown in slow motion: a cyclist hit by a car, a woman in a crowded bus that has to brake suddenly, a man in his car who can't stand the traffic jams, emissions and noise anymore, pedestrians who do not have enough space to walk on the pavement etc.

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By Robert Pressl / Updated: 13 Aug 2019

Urban Transport Roadmaps Tool - PROSPERITY training material

The Urban Transport Roadmaps (UTR) on-line scenario building tool (www.urban-transport-roadmaps.eu ), commissioned by DG MOVE, is designed to support cities in exploring alternative transport scenarios / roadmaps and in translating their vision on sustainable urban mobility into a concrete set of actions for their Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMPs).

With its easy-to-use approach, the tool allows to:

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By Robert Pressl / Updated: 13 Aug 2019

Urban Freight Transport & City Logistics and SUMP - PROSPERITY training material

The municipal stakeholders in UFT are very different in their view of this transport and their interest to solve related problems. City administration is looking for reducing traffic impact. Delivery companies try to organise the commercial vehicle tours as efficient as possible. Sender and consignees (e.g. shop owner, private purchaser) are looking for transport prices and just in time delivery. Citizens with a car are unhappy about lorries which are stopping in second lane.

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By Robert Pressl / Updated: 13 Aug 2019

Monitoring and evaluation - PROSPERITY SUMP training material

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities are used to provide information to planners and decision makers to identify problems, potential successes or need for readjustment of a SUMP and its measures. M&E is an essential part of a SUMP in order to keep track of the planning process and measure implementation to understand what works well and less well, and to build the business case and evidence base for the wider application of similar measures in the future.

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By Robert Pressl / Updated: 13 Aug 2019

Use of public space and SUMP - PROSPERITY training material

Public space has always been a very controversial topic largely studied from the perspective of various research fields and figuring among the main themes considered by the European cities. Since it is public, everybody should be able to use it, but in practice the situation is much more complex. Actually, its use is highly determined by its design and has a crucial influence on the accessibility of various places, on the urban mobility and ultimately on the quality of life.

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By Robert Pressl / Updated: 13 Aug 2019

Achieving Political and Internal Buy-In - PROSPERITY training material

The most fundamental impediment to start a SUMP transformation in many cities is often not the lack of solutions, planning skills or resources but rather a missing culture for innovation and transformational governance, and a low degree of political momentum to foster such a culture. There is a strong need to identify ways to inspire cities to take action at the political level. And moreover, to commit to sustainable urban mobility goals.

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By Robert Pressl / Updated: 13 Aug 2019

Communication and Stakeholder Involvement - PROSPERITY training material

Transport experts need to find new approaches that can better integrate new forms of operation, while seeking solutions for complex problems. Transport planning cannot be carried out any more by any player, at any organisational level, using an isolated approach. Instead of just communication the results of a technocratic or political decision making process, it is necessary to compromise through facilitation and mediation using the expertise of all the players involved. If an administration, e.g.

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By Robert Pressl / Updated: 13 Aug 2019

How does SUMP mesh with statutory land use plans - PROSPERITY Training Material

Land Use Planning is statutory (obligatory by law) and SUMP is not. Land use planning has a very strong influence on the mobility behaviour of future residents, as land use plans determine density, use mix and the space for transport infrastructure including parking. As Land Use is stable over longer periods (it normally takes time to change built structures), it is of utmost importance to take into account mobility when a new area is developed. It is very difficult to change mobility behaviour once everything is built and a certain mobility behaviour has already been established.

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