Activity 2.2: Strive for policy coordination and an integrated planning approach

GLOSSARY TERMS

By Admin Eltis / Updated: 28 May 2019

Rationaleinfo-icon

A principal shortcoming of urban transport planning today is the lack of coordination between policies and organisations, far beyond an integrationinfo-icon of transport modes (e.g. coordination with land-use planning, environmental protection, social inclusioninfo-icon, genderinfo-icon equityinfo-icon, economic development, safety, health, education, information technologies). Addressing this deficit represents a major challenge for sustainable urban mobilityinfo-icon planning, but is also a main source for innovation and improvement.

 

Aims

  • Acknowledge the interactions between changes in urban structures (density, functions, socio-economic patterns, ecosystems) and mobility.
  • Ensure that linkages between different transport modes are considered rather than addressing them in isolation.
  • Establish the planning of mobility and transport as a shared policyinfo-icon domain, truly serving the different needs of society – economic, social, environmental – and not as an end in itself.
  • Define how sustainable urban mobility planning and other policies at the local, regional, national and European level can be integrated.

 

Tasks

  • Review plans that may have an impact on urban mobility, e.g. national and regional plans (> related to Activity 1.2 “Assess impact of regional/national level”), including plans from other policy domains at the local level, plans of transport companies, and plans of neighbouring municipalities.
  • Identify coordination requirements and potential across all relevant policy domains and levels. An example is the relation between land-use planning and transport. Transport impacts need to be considered in the land-use planning process to maximise the use of sustainable travel to new developments. 
  • Check whether the goals and objectives of the plans support or conflict with sustainable urban mobility objectives. There could be a conflict, for example, if a health improvement plan emphasises physical activity only through organised sport, as opposed to increased walking and cycling for everyday trips.
  • Take an open and transparent approach to actor cooperation from the outset, securing the involvement of actors from different policy fields (e.g. different administrative departments).
  • Develop common actions in cooperation with actors from other policy fields, especially in areas most closely related to mobility (land use, energy, environmentinfo-icon, economic development, social inclusion, health and safety). Strive for a modification of sectoral policies and practices and/or create new fields of activity.
  • Ensure regular communication and exchange between relevant authorities (and within authorities, e.g. through regular meetings between transport and land-use planners).
  • Make sure that linkages between different transport modes are taken into account and that intermodalityinfo-icon becomes a topic within the Sustainable Urban Mobility Planinfo-icon. This includes links to long-distance transport corridors such as the trans-European transport network (for details see: http://ec.europa.eu/transport/infrastructure/index_en.htm).

 

Timing and coordination

  • Start from the outset as a continuous activity

 

Checklist

Relevant policy linkages identified (synergies and conflicts).
Initial options for policy integration assessed
Dialogue established with all concerned actors about integration possibilities.
Initial prioritisation of integration options decided.
Assessmentinfo-icon and prioritisation specified according to advanced scenarioinfo-icon building results (> Activity 3.2).

 

Examples

West Midlands, England: Joint Officer Group Working

Centro, the West Midlands Integrated Transport Authorityinfo-icon, led the development of the West Midlands Local Transport Plan (LTP) 2011-2026. A monthly LTP Committee was set up to oversee the development of the plan to ensure it was consistent with other local, regional and national policy agendas and responded to local citizens’ needs. The Committee consisted of local politicians and district officers from all the West Midlands District Authorities. These District Authorities have responsibility for land use planning, highways and public health and provide therefore strong links with other sectors outside of transport.

Source: Steven Keeley, Centro - West Midlands Integrated Transport Authority

 

Kouvola Region, Finland: Inter-sectoral working group

In the Kouvola Region, an inter-sectoral working group was established which bases its work on an agreement by all relevant parties to implement traffic policy in harmony with the regional transport system plan. The initial group with representatives from the Regional Council, the Finnish Road Administration, the Finnish Rail Administration, the State Office and all seven municipalities of the region was later expanded to also include the regional public health services and the regional public environment centre, as well as citizens and other relevant stakeholders.

 

Budapest, Hungary: Fitting a mobility plan into the overall municipal policy framework

The City of Budapest is developing a new Urban Mobility Plan based on sustainable urban mobility planning principles. The new plan is fully integrated into the wider policy framework and takes account of the recent changes in transport governanceinfo-icon as well as the new development priorities in times of the economic crisis.

 

Île-de-France: City logisticsinfo-icon - a particular need for an integrated approach

During the development of the Île-de-France PDU, the region has set up a “concertation body” bringing together all relevant stakeholders: haulers, transport companies, chambers of commerce and industry, State departments, the City of Paris, regional planning office and the national environmental agency ADEME. The tasks of the “concertation body” are to encourage and finance innovative city logistic projects, to bundle transport means and to support multimodal distribution centres.

More info: 

West Midlands, England: Joint Officer Group Working

Centro, the West Midlands Integrated Transport Authorityinfo-icon, led the development of the West Midlands Local Transport Plan (LTP) 2011-2026. A monthly LTP Committee was set up to oversee the development of the plan to ensure it was consistent with other local, regional and national policyinfo-icon agendas and responded to local citizens’ needs. The Committee consisted of local politicians and district officers from all the West Midlands District Authorities. These District Authorities have responsibility for land use planning, highways and public health and provide therefore strong links with other sectors outside of transport.

Source: Steven Keeley, Centro - West Midlands Integrated Transport Authority

Kouvola region, Finland: Inter-sectoral working group

In the Kouvola Region of Finland, the Sustainable Urban Mobility Planinfo-icon was also linked to the regional, the state level and EU policies. “We need to look at policies all the way from the top to the bottom, making the whole process more coherent and influence policies and processes made by regional and national actors,” says Hannu Koverola, Planning Manager for the Kouvola Region Federation of Municipalities.

“Sustainable urban transport is one of our priorities. Authorities and organisations that decide on funding also play a key role in implementing policies. The federation of municipalities is present in regional projects in one way or another, either as experts, financer or coordinators.”

In Kouvola, an inter-sectoral working group was created as a result of the regional transport plan. The working group has representatives from the Regional Council, the Finnish Road Administration, the Finnish Rail Administration, the State Office and all seven municipalities.

After the planning process started, the working group was expanded to include the regional public health services and the regional public environmentinfo-icon centre, as well as citizens and other relevant stakeholders.

The group bases its work on an agreement, a letter of intent signed by all relevant parties to implement traffic policyinfo-icon in harmony with the Kouvola region transport system plan,” Koverola says.

The challenge is to get all parties to stick to this agreement. To date, policy coordination has been useful in planning land use. The targetinfo-icon is to promote sustainable modes of transport by making them realistic all the way from cooperating on policies to implementing joint actions with sufficient resources.

Source: BUSTRIP Project 2007, Moving sustainably – Guide to Sustainable Urban Transport Plans, www.movingsustainably.net/index.php/movsus:planning_process

Budapest, Hungary: Fitting a mobility plan into the overall municipal policy framework

The General Assembly of the Municipality of Budapest accepted the first transport development plan in 2001. It was revised in 2009 in order to reflect the rapidly changing environmentinfo-icon. However, these plans were mainly project-oriented documents with limited involvement of stakeholders in their preparation. In 2012, mainly because of the changes in transport governanceinfo-icon, development priorities and the economic crisis, a new revision was needed.

During this on-going task the new urban development strategyinfo-icon of Budapest and the available financial resources are taken into account. The integrated transport organising authorityinfo-icon, BKK Centre for Budapest Transport, plans to develop a new Urban Mobilityinfo-icon Plan based on these guidelines and the results of the revision.

Besides the development plans, the “Heart of Budapest” programme (which was created to revitalise the inner city of Budapest through large-scale traffic calming in 2007) bears most of the characteristics of a Sustainable Urban Mobility Planinfo-icon as described in these guidelines – for example, stakeholders (e.g. local residents and shop owners) were consulted during the development process. The programme is clearly committed to sustainabilityinfo-icon by prioritising non-motorised local transport and it integrates traffic calming with other issues, most importantly that of local business development and enhancement of the quality of lifeinfo-icon.

More information on the Heart of Budapest programme: www.eltis.org/index.php?id=13&study_id=2961

Source: Gábor Heves, Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern Europe and László Sándor Kerényi, BKK Centre for Budapest Transport

Île-de-France: City logistics - a particular need for an integrated approach

While passenger transportation is mainly an activity of public organisations or operators which are controlled by the public service, freight logistics are performed by private organisations; this concerns distribution centres, which are more and more located within the greater belts of cities due to favourable land prices, and it concerns as well the inner-city delivery services. Nevertheless, the population suffers from the emissions, the noise and the congestion generated by many deliveries as well as from the consequences of accidents with vans and trucks.

In view of the conflict of interests and negative impacts and image of city logisticsinfo-icon, the Île-de-France region has set up a body that brings together all relevant stakeholders: haulers, transport companies, chambers of commerce and industry, State departments, the City of Paris, regional planning office and the national environmental agency ADEME. The tasks of this body are to encourage and finance innovative city logistic projects, to bundle transport means and to support multimodal distribution centres.

New distribution centres respond to the particular needs of a capital such as Paris while considering the city framework and quality of lifeinfo-icon of the population. The organisation of rail transport is getting more flexible. The advantage of a navigable waterway – the river Seine – is used to have freight access to the city centre. Distribution centres are connected better to the rail and river network. On a regulation level, road charging is being set up on other roads than highways and a special parking system is being developed, delivery regulations are harmonised within the region in order to avoid ongoing infringement of different incoherent regulations, companies are invited to combine deliveries with the aim of using smaller lorries instead of uncountable delivery vans.

All these projects, and their impacts on emissions and congestion, are only possible if the different stakeholders, in particular the private ones, are fully involved in the planning procedures.

Source: STIF (Syndicat des Transports d’Île-de-France), 2012: Plan de déplacements urbains, Défi 7 : Rationaliser l’organisation des flux de marchandises et favoriser l’usage de la voie d’eau et du train, Conseil Régional d’Île-de-France, février 2012, http://ile-de-france.ademe.fr/Plan-de-deplacements-urbains-PDU.html