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Activity 1.4: Review availability of resources

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GLOSSARY TERMS

The aim of the SUMP Glossary is to provide a brief explanation of specialist words, terms and abbreviations relating to the subject of sustainable urban mobility planning. The Glossary has been prepared by the CH4LLENGE project and as a result, there is a particular focus on defining terms relating to the four key challenges of plan development studied by the project, namely: participation, cooperation, measure selection and monitoring & evaluation. It is envisaged that, over time, the international community of mobility practitioners will add to the content of the online Glossary and produce versions in different languages.
A simple structure has been followed so that users can search for words, terms and abbreviations in a standard alphabetic format. For each Glossary term, the following information is provided:
• a general definition and, where available, a specific definition relating to transport and mobility planning;
• an explanation of why the term is relevant to sustainable urban mobility planning; and
• references to sources.
The preparation of the Glossary, including the selection of terms and drafting of definitions, has been informed by a review of relevant reports, guidance documents and existing glossaries. The key reference is the European Union “Guidelines - Developing and implementing a Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan” prepared for the EC’s Intelligent Energy Europe (IEE) programme by Rupprecht Consult (January 2014) and therefore this has not been identified as a source throughout the document. The outputs of the CH4LLENGE project have also provided a principal source of information and the official documents can be found at www.sump-challenges.eu.

Please note that not all the explanatory text is taken directly from the listed sources. The authors have sought to take established definitions and information as the basis and explain these in simple terms and relate them to the context of sustainable urban mobility planning where this was not previously the case.

Por Admin Eltis / Actualizado: 11 Nov 2015

Rationaleinfo-icon

Closely linked to the self-assessmentinfo-icon is the question of the available resources for carrying out the Sustainable Urban Mobility Planinfo-icon development process and for implementing measures. This includes human resources (i.e. available staff and skills) as well as financial resources. Without sufficient resources it will be difficult to run a successful plan. For most public authorities, the specific skills required for running the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan process will exceed the capacities of their staff. While it may be common practice to bring in external expertise for particular technical tasks, it is also important to think about building up expertise in your own organisation, and co-operating with other stakeholders over the long term.

The aim is to cover immediate skill requirements, by subcontracting if needed, but also to develop and keep expertise on sustainable urban mobilityinfo-icon planning within your own organisation.

 

Aims

  • Ensure that the necessary (wide) range of skills for managing and driving the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan process is available in your local authorityinfo-icon and among stakeholders.
  • Balance short-term skill requirements and build capacity within your own organisation and in the wider professional community.
  • Assess the confirmed and potential financial resources for running the planning process and for implementing measures.

 

Tasks

  • Assess skills available within the leading organisation(s) and among stakeholders. Ensure that all core skills for sustainable urban mobility planning are considered. See list below.
  • Develop a simple skill management plan that outlines a strategyinfo-icon to cover skill gaps (e.g. through training, cooperation, subcontracting). This should be done by someone who is familiar with the sustainable urban mobility planning process (if applicable in cooperation with your human resources manager).
  • Define the required budget for the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan development process and ensure political approval.
  • Assess the likely budgetary framework for measureinfo-icon implementation. Consider local, regional, national and EU funding opportunities. This will probably still be a rough estimate at this stage, but will help you stay realistic.

 

Activities beyond essential requirements

  • Cooperation between responsible organisations to fill potential skill gaps.
  • Involvement of external partners (e.g. consultants, universities) to fill skill gaps as needed.
  • Recruitment: In the case of skill shortages, consider hiring people with a non-transport-related background for specific tasks (e.g. marketing).
    This kind of “thinking outside the box” helps bring in the fresh perspective that is a key part of sustainable urban mobility planning.
    Also consider combining the resources of different stakeholders to finance staff (see Aachen example below).

 

Timing and coordination

  • To be considered from the outset as it is essential for the constitution of the team that will be involved in the actual planning process

 

Checklist

Required skills and financial resources for planning process analysed.
Skills management plan compiled.
Budget for running sustainable urban mobility planning process politically approved.
Likely budgetary framework for measure implementation assessed.

 

Details on the tasks

Developing a skill management plan

 

(Figure amended from PILOT project 2007, www.pilot-transport.org/)


 


Core skill requirements for sustainable urban mobility planning

Management skills (required during the entire sustainable urban mobility planning process)

Project management (incl. political liaison)

Technical management

Financial management

Staff management (incl. managing multidisciplinary teams made up of internal and external staff)

Technical skills (required during the entire process)

Urban planning and transport planning

Other important sectoral policies (economic, social, environmental)

Basic knowledge of policyinfo-icon at other levels – regional, national, EU

Operational skills
(required for particular Activities)

Related Element/ Activity

Stakeholderinfo-icon and citizeninfo-icon involvement

Activity 2.4 Plan stakeholder and citizen involvement

Step 4. Develop a common visioninfo-icon

Activity 9.3 Create ownershipinfo-icon of the plan

Activity 10.2 Inform and engage citizens (measure implementation)

Development, monitoringinfo-icon and
evaluationinfo-icon of indicators

Step 3. Analyse the mobility situation and develop scenarios

Step 5. Set priorities and measurable targets

Step 8. Build monitoring and evaluation into the plan

Datainfo-icon collection and analysis

Step 3. Analyse the mobility situation and develop options

Step 8. Build monitoring and assessment into the plan

Modelling and scenarioinfo-icon development

Activity 3.2 Develop scenarios

Information and public
relations, Marketing

Activity 2.3 Plan stakeholder and citizen involvement

Step 4. Develop a common vision and engage citizens

Activity 9.3 Create ownership of the plan

Activity 10.2 Inform and engage citizens (measure implementation)

Accounting

Activity 2.4 Agree on work plan and management arrangements

Activity 7.2 Prepare an action and budget plan

Procurement

Activity 7.2 Prepare an action and budget plan

Activity 10.1 Manage plan implementation

Source: Pilot full manual 2007, table amended, www.pilot-transport.org/index.php?id=48


 

Examples

Bristol, England: Skill management in joint local transport plan

The Councils involved in the development of the Joint Local Transport Plan for the Greater Bristol area value skill management via trainings and a multi-disciplinary work approach as a critical factor to ensure high quality transport planning.

 

Örebro, Sweden: Promoting a new way of thinking

Örebro set up a special unit within its administration to facilitate the implementation of sustainable urban transport and raise awareness among fellow employees as well as politicians. Seminars focusing on the reduced need for cars through spatial planning were organised as just one means of introducing a new and more holistic way of thinking.

 

France: Responsabilities for PDU (Plans de Déplacements Urbains) development

The Urban Transport Authority (AOTU) responsible by law for the development and implementation of a PDU often seeks assistance from a variety of stakeholders, including urban development agencies, private consultancies, and regional transport research centres (CETEs).

 

France: Costs of PDU development

The costs of the development of a PDU differs widely and depends on the scope of the PDU, the availability of existing plans and studies, the nature of the envisaged PDU, and the external assistance required. In France, the authority generally spends between 200,000 and 400,000 EUR on the development of a PDU. These accounts, however, are not always complete and some hidden costs, or costs covered by external subsidies are not included in these figures.

Source: Rupprecht Consult, based on GART, 2010: Plan de Déplacements Urbains: Panorama 2009, Paris, avril 2010.

 

Aachen, Germany: Chamber of industry and commerce finances a mobility manager

In a unique effort (in Germany) of bundling financial resources to carry out mobility management, a part-time mobility manager is funded two-thirds by the City of Aachen’s environmentinfo-icon department and one-third by the chamber of industry and commerce.

More info: 

Bristol, England: Skill management in joint local transport plan

Ensuring continuous improvement in project management skills forms a key part of ongoing staff development within the Councils that joined to develop a common LTP in the Greater Bristol area. Internal programmes of project management development are already in place and key staff across the transport sectors are under regular review to ensure standards are continuously improved.

Wider than project management, the authorities are working with internal and external training agencies and local universities to explore further opportunities for both developing existing staff and bringing new trainees into the authorities. Where external expertise is used, the approach is to integrate these staff into the project teams. This approach ensures that through close working within a multi-disciplinary project team, the strengths and skills base of in-house staff are expanded and developed.

Skill management is seen as critical to high quality transport planning, which is needed to ensure sufficient government funding.

JLTP available from: http://travelplus.org.uk/our-vision/joint-local-transport-plan-2

Örebro, Sweden: Promoting a new way of thinking

The common view of sustainable transport was not so strong in Örebro when the sustainable urban mobilityinfo-icon planning process started. To change the situation, the city used various measures. A capacity-building assessmentinfo-icon was carried out in a working group as part of the self-assessment, identifying the knowledge gaps among the employees. The finding was that the municipality has a good detailed knowledge of transport-related issues, but mainly within narrow fields. “For many professionals a more holistic way of thinking can be a bit of a revolution,” says Per Elvingson, who started as a process manager for sustainable transport soon after the assessment.

To facilitate the implementation of sustainable urban transport, a special unit – also responsible for raising awareness among employees and politicians – was set up. The unit has, among other things, planned seminars focusing on the reduced need for cars through spatial planning. In general, a new way of thinking is the key. “It must be established, especially among key persons, to make the process more powerful.

An important part of capacity buildinginfo-icon has been getting all key staff to agree on a common analysis of the current situation. In this respect, the Sustainable Urban Mobility Planinfo-icon template has been a very good toolinfo-icon.” Meanwhile, it is important to look around at what others are doing beyond municipal borders. “It is very important to provide our decision-makers with very practical, good examples that have already been tested.” International cooperation has become more important in this process.

Over the past few years, Örebro has focused on exchanging experiences. Study visits are an important part of that work. “On a national level, we are trying to build up an informal network for sustainable transport among cities of our own size in the region,” Elvingson says.

Source: BUSTRIP Project 2007, Moving sustainably – Guide to Sustainable Urban Transport Plans, www.movingsustainably.net

France: Responsabilities for PDU (Plans de Déplacements Urbains) development

In France, the Urban Transport Authorityinfo-icon (AOTU) is responsible, by law, for the development and implementation of a PDU (=SUMP). The responsible authority is often assisted both in the preparation of the work plan and in the development of the PDU itself.

Some authorities delegate part of the work to the urban development agency of which they are a member, or which they select through a call for tender. Others manage the development of the plan themselves while tendering part of the intellectual work to private consultancies.

The regional transport research centres (CETEs) are in general also involved in the elaboration of the PDUs. A number of stakeholders are involved in PDU development. At a minimum, the following stakeholders should be involved during the different development steps:

Table: The PDU development stages and stakeholders involved

The PDU development stages and stakeholders involved

Stages

Actors involved others than the competent authority

Elaboration or revision

of the PDU

Actors associated: State; Department; Region

Formalising of the draft PDU

Actors consulted: State; Department; Region; Municipalities within the geographical area; Other consulted actors on their demand (associations of transport professionals and users, environmental associations, chamber of commerce, etc.)

Official public enquiry

Actors consulted: General public (the opinions of the public stakeholders are attached to the draft PDU)

Approval of the PDU

The competent authority approves the PDU, if needed modified following the consultationinfo-icon of the public stakeholders and the report of the public enquiry commission

Implementation of the PDU

Municipalities: compatibility of the local urban development plans, and the road network management; State and department: compatibility with the national and department road network management

Evaluationinfo-icon

The competent authority is obliged to evaluate the PDU realisation. It is recommended to involve all actors that were involved in the initial development of the PDU

Source: rupprecht Consult, basen on "Transport et mobilité, les dossiers du CERTU nº 146", << La concertation dans les PDU: pourquoi? Avec Qui? Comment?>>, CERTU, Lyon, janvier 2006. 

Aachen, Germany: Chamber of industry and commerce finances a mobility manager

An example for thinking outside the box with regard to financial resources is the cooperation between the City of Aachen’s environmentinfo-icon department and its chamber of industry and commerce. They have jointly financed a part-time mobilityinfo-icon manager since 2008. The basis for this was the Clean-Air Plan, in which many measures were agreed on to promote alternatives to cars, especially for trips to work.

The part-time mobility manager is responsible for consulting the chamber’s member companies regarding public transport offers and represents the interests of the member companies in the field of mobility management. The mobility manager is funded two-thirds by the City of Aachen and one-third by the chamber. The approach of bundling financial resources for running mobility management is unique for Germany and a good example of how public authorities can maximise resources when funding is tight. The joint funding of staff by involved parties should be considered from the beginning to ensure sufficient human resources to set up the plan and to monitor the implementation of measures.

More information (in German) available from www.effizient-mobil.de/index.php?id=aachen

Source: Rupprecht Consult based on input from the City of Aachen