Results of Eurotest’s Pedestrian Crossings Assessment 2010

By News Editor / Updated: 01 Aug 2014
One in five pedestrian crossings failed this year's EuroTest assignment, the worst result since testing started in 2008, highlighting the need for urgent improvements.
The EuroTest Pedestrian Crossing Assessment (EPCA) was conducted for the third consecutive year from June to October 2010. In 18 cities located in 13 European countries, around 270 pedestrian crossings, found in three distinct areas of each city were examined and subjected to comparative analysis.

One in five pedestrian crossings failed this year's EuroTest assignment, the worst result since testing started in 2008, highlighting the need for urgent improvements. Better accessibility, greater harmonization of rules governing the types of infrastructure (traffic light schemes, road markings, etc.) and behaviour at pedestrian crossings as well as more effective use of technologies are key issues if safety is to be improved.
Almost 2,000 of the 8,000 pedestrians killed annually, die in accidents on or in the vicinity of a pedestrian crossing. EuroTest shows that since the first test in 2008, higher numbers of crossings fail the test: one in eight in 2008; one in six in 2009 and one in five in 2010.

EuroTest conclude there is a need to streamline the large variety of pedestrian crossings designs across Europe, and standardise the traffic rules governing how to cross the road. Safety at pedestrian crossings must feature in European road safety policies for the coming decade for the sake of safe pedestrian mobility in urban areas.

Source: Eurotest Mobility
Country: 
Europe-wide
Topic: 
Clean and energy-efficient vehicles